6/25/2021

July 2021, No.154



For the first time in over a year I ate at a restaurant; and, with whom did I make this momentous step forward you might ask – CAHSLA of course! It was great to see members in person at our end-of-year “picnic” at The Pub at Rookwood. We exchanged cicada experiences, laughed, and brainstormed upcoming programs.

Thanks to everyone who served the previous year: Amy Koshoffer (Vice President/President Elect); Emily Kean (Treasurer); Lisa McCormick (Secretary and Chronicle Editor); Barbarie Hill (Chronicle Editor); and Emily Kean and Amy Koshoffer (Technology Committee). And thank you to the incoming elected officers: Amy Koshoffer (President); Alex Temple (Vice President/President Elect); Emily Kean (Treasurer); and Lisa McCormick (Secretary).

Stays tuned for future in-person CAHSLA meetings and have a great summer!

Respectfully submitted,
Jennifer Pettigrew, President

Secretary’s Report

End-of-the-Year “Picnic” Meeting


Date: June 7, 2021
Time: 5:30 p.m. - 6:45 p.m.
Location: The Pub, Rookwood, Cincinnati, Ohio
Present: Pettigrew, Jennifer; Kean, Emily; Starbuck, Edith; Temple, Alex; McCormick, Lisa

President Jennifer Pettigrew welcomed everyone to the “picnic” gathering organized by Amy Koshoffer. After some initial discussion of the cicada invasion, Jennifer announced the results of the election (results published below). Jennifer thanked officers and presented each with a unique ceramic cicada magnet in appreciation for their service. Emily Kean thanked Jennifer for her leadership and service and presented her with a gift certificate to Renaissance Garden Accents.

We briefly explored ideas for the 2021-2022 CAHSLA association year as we anticipate that we can have in-person meetings.

Edith Starbuck shared that she will be retiring from the University of Cincinnati Health Sciences Library at the end of June. Emily announced that staff will be returning to onsite work at UC in mid-July.

Conversation continued as we enjoyed our selections from the Pub's British inspired menu. The gathering ended about 6:45 p.m.

Respectfully submitted,
Lisa McCormick, Secretary

Treasurer and Membership Chair Report

CHECKING BALANCE

as of 05/12/2021:

$2,013.43

CHECKING DEPOSITS

 

$0.00

CHECKING DEPOSIT TOTALS

 

$0.00

CHECKING WITHDRAWALS

Presidents Gift Reimbursement

$51.00

CHECKING WITHDRAWAL TOTALS

 

$51.00

CHECKING BALANCE

as of 06/25/2021:

$1,962.43

CASH BALANCE

as of 05/12/2021:

$20.00

CASH DEPOSITS

 

$0.00

CASH WITHDRAWALS

 

$0.00

CASH BALANCE

as of 06/25/2021:

$20.00

TOTAL ASSETS

as of 06/25/2021:

$1,982.43

 

 

 


MEMBERS

Regular (Paid) 9
Student (Paid) 0
Life Members 11
TOTAL 20

Respectfully submitted,
Emily Kean, Treasurer

Program Committee Report

Event

Venue

Date

Guest Speaker

Theme

Number of Attendees

% of Total Membership (n/21)

Membership Meeting

Webex

9/15/2020

None

Introduction of CAHSLA officers | Game – Two Truths and a Lie

11

52.4

Holiday Gathering

Webex

12/8/2020

Melanie Moore

Cincinnati Book Bus - Sharing favorite seasonal items

10

47.6

Mid winter Meeting

Webex

2/25/2021

None

Jeopardy Game on Cincinnati Literary History

8

38.1

Spring Education Meeting

Webex

4/13/2021

June Taylor-Slaughter

Presentation: Microaggressions

6

28.6

End of Year Picnic

The Pub- Rookwood

6/7/2021

None

“Picnic”

5

23.8

Avg per meeting

 

 

 

 

8

38.1


Respectfully submitted,
Amy Koshoffer, Program Committee Chair

Election Committee Report

The results are in, and I thank you all for taking the time to participate in this year’s election of CAHSLA Officers.

I am pleased to announce your CAHSLA Officers for the upcoming year:

· Amy Koshoffer – President

· Alex Temple – Vice President/President Elect

· Emily Kean – Treasurer

· Lisa McCormick – Secretary


Respectfully submitted,
Jennifer Pettigrew, President

Annual Report: Secretary Report

For the 2020-2021 association year, minutes were recorded and submitted to the Chronicle:
  • Executive Committee Transition Meeting – August 4, 2020
  • Meeting Minutes – September 15, 2020
  • Meeting Minutes – December 8, 2020
  • Meeting Minutes – February 25, 2021
  • Meeting Minutes – April 13, 2021
  • Meeting Minutes – June 7, 2021
Respectfully submitted,
Lisa McCormick, Secretary

Annual Report: Chronicle

For the 2020-2021 association year, the CAHSLA Chronicle was published four times:
  • October 2020 Issue # 151
  • December 2020 Issue #152
  • May 2021 Issue #153
  • July 2021 Issue #154.
Respectfully submitted,
Barbarie Hill and Lisa McCormick, Editors








Retirement Announcement

Our colleague, Edith Starbuck, Information Services Librarian, UC Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library, is retiring on June 30th. Edith’s leadership positions in CAHSLA are numerous and include president (2019-2019, 2014-2015, 2004-2009), and chair and committee member for the program committee for many years. We are grateful to Edith for her leadership, service, dedication, wisdom, and humor in guiding CAHSLA through the ups and downs of an ever-changing library/information services environment.

When Edith announced her retirement, I thought it might be fitting to capture some information for the Chronicle, and Edith readily agreed to answer a few questions below. Edith, you are an irreplaceable colleague. Happy retirement, it’s well deserved!

Q: Where did you obtain your library degree?
A: My MLS is from Indiana University.

Q: What was your first library job?
A:My first library job was as a cataloger at the Hebrew Union College Klau Library. I did a cataloging practicum with Klau Library prior to graduating from IU and they were kind enough to hire me part-time as a Cataloger until I found another job.

Q: If your first library job was not in a medical library, what was your first medical library job?
A: After the Klau Library, my next job was at the UC Health Sciences Library as a temporary media cataloger. It was that opportunity that eventually became a full-time position which grew and evolved into a career.

Q: Do you recall meeting a library luminary/leader in the field?
A: I met Ann McKibbon in person when she taught an EBM CE class for Midwest MLA 2009 in Columbus, OH. I was a bit in awe of her and her PhD in Biomedical Informatics.

Q: What is your first CAHSLA "memory"?
A: Casting back, I don’t seem to have a ‘first’ memory. Instead, I have fond memories of many fun or interesting meetings and gatherings. Among my favorites were the holiday potlucks with good food, games, carols, and great camaraderie.

Q: What are you looking forward to in retirement?
A: I am looking forward to the luxury of time. I want to spend more time with friends, revisit hobbies, and explore new ones, slowly tackle house projects, plus more.

Q: What are your words of wisdom/encouragement to those in the field? 
A: Getting involved with professional organizations like CAHSLA has been a very rewarding part of my library career. That involvement provides opportunities to grow professionally and network with colleagues. Networking helps build connections which are helpful throughout a career. Connections can serve as collective wisdom to help resolve an issue or come to a decision. Those connections may also grow into long-term friendships. CAHSLA connections are special, and I look forward to enjoying those connections and programs in retirement.


Alex Temple, MLIS

Consumer Health Information Specialist | Medical Library Association

Hello everybody! I was excited to join CAHSLA in January, and am now even more excited to serve as Vice President. A little about me- I work at the Cincinnati & Hamilton County Public Library, currently at the Madisonville branch, however most of my background is from the Information & Reference department at the main branch. I have also been able to volunteer at the Winkler Center for the last few years, which sparked my interested in serving the medical community as a librarian. I would be remiss to fail to mention that the Sawbones podcast also fueled my interest in working in health libraries. If you’re unfamiliar with it, it is a podcast about all the missteps in medical history. I also have a passion and background in preservation, for cultural heritage materials as well as architectural preservation. After the couple of meetings I’ve been able to attend so far, I can tell I’m in good company, and I look forward working and meeting with you all in the coming years!









Brood X Cicadas “Invade” Local Research Library
The local news station, WLWT, used the Lloyd Library and Museum’s Insect Exhibit for a story on the cicada invasion of 2021. The news story aired on June 16. In early May, when we were on “cicada watch” Local 19 News also did a story on the Library’s cicada collection.


The Lloyd highlights books from their collections on their web page. According to the website, “etymology, or the study of insects, is well represented in the Lloyd’s collections.” Additionally, The Lloyd is hosting the Incredible Insects Exhibition. “The Cicada Room features a photo exhibition by leading cicada expert, Gene Kritsky, and artist books inspired by cicadas from members of the Cincinnati Book Arts Society” Be sure to check out the Library’s event page for upcoming lectures related to the exhibition. If you are still in need of a t-shirt, tote bag, or notecards to memorialize the Brood X cicada appearance, the Lloyd has you covered with a variety of items at their gift shop or online https://www.redbubble.com/people/lloydlibrary/shop.


Summer Reads for the Aspiring Physician

If you are looking for your summer “beach reading” list, look no further. The American Association of Medical Colleges (AAMC) is out with Volume 6 of “Great Summer Reads for Aspiring Physicians.” Below are the ten titles on the list. Please see the full article for a description of each book.

1. The Real Doctor Will See You Shortly: A Physician's First Year by Matt McCarthy, MD

2. Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers by Mary Roach

3. Womb With a View: Tales from the Delivery, Emergency and Operating Rooms by Rebecca Levy-Gantt, DO

4. Do No Harm: Stories of Life, Death and Brain Surgery by Henry Marsh, MD

5. An Elegant Defense: The Extraordinary New Science of the Immune System: A Tale in Four Lives by Matt Ritchel

6. Hundreds of Interlaced Fingers: A Kidney Doctor's Search for the Perfect Match by Vanessa Grubbs, MD

7. Open Heart: A Cardiac Surgeon's Stories of Life and Death on the Operating Table by Stephen Westaby, MD

8. The First Cell: And the Human Costs of Pursuing Cancer to the Last by Azra Raza, MD

9. Letter to a Young Female Physician: Notes from a Medical Life by Suzanne Koven, MD

10. Complications: A Surgeon’s Notes on an Imperfect Science by Atul Gawande, MD, MPH

AMA/ JAMA Face Reckoning for Podcast Questionings Systemic Racism in Medicine

In February 2020, The Journal of the American Medical Association – Internal Medicine aired a podcast featuring JAMA deputy editor Edward Livingstone and Mitchell Katz, an editor at JAMA Internal Medicine and CEO of NYC Health + Hospitals. In the episode, "Livingstone questioned whether racism could be embedded in society since it is illegal and questioned whether it was necessary to use the term racism since it might make people feel bad."  The podcast and a subsequent tweet questioning whether structural racism exists, resulted in a backlash from physicians and the public, resulting in a petition with 9,000 signatures calling for “wide spread change” at JAMA  according to a Stat News article.  The journal’s editor-in-chief, Howard Bauchner, accepted responsibility for the podcast and offered his apologies.  Bauchner stepped down from his editorial role in June.  Livingstone resigned in March. 

Lack of Evidence-Based Scholarship on Racism in Leading Medical Journals

“Ignorance is neither neutral nor benign, especially when it cloaks evidence of harm". This is the beginning sentence for the article, Medicine’s Privileged Gatekeepers: Producing Harmful Ignorance about Racism and Health by Nancy Krieger Rhea W. Boyd Fernando De Maio Aletha Maybank.

The authors set out to conduct a literature review and assessment of articles published in 4 major medical journals, The New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA, The Lancet, and BMH - The British Medical Journal. For comparison, they also searched for article in the American Journal of Public Health and the Annual Reviews series. The search term used was "racism." Krieger et al's intent was to build upon the 2018 Hardeman et al publication, Naming Institutionalized Racism in the Public Health Literature: A Systematic Literature Review. [Public Health Reports. 2018;133(3):240-249. doi:10.1177/003335491876057].

According to the Health Affairs blog: "Our novel contribution is three-fold: (1) we extend the analysis to include articles from 1990-2020, thereby expanding the time frame and capturing the past year of increased explicit discourse and action about racism and health; (2) we distinguish between articles that present viewpoints versus empirical scientific investigations; and (3) we deliberately focus on the world’s four leading medical journals, as well as bringing in selected comparators.”

The blog continues, “The results are not pretty. As we show, only in the past year have these leading journals begun noticeably increasing publication of articles on this topic, with the vast majority of even these papers solely viewpoints, not evidence-based empirical studies.”

See the Health Affairs blog posting for the authors’ literature review results and analysis of findings.

NYPL Publishes Book on Peculiar Research Questions

Before the Internet, reference librarians were the main source of answers to life's peculiar questions. "A couple of years ago, staff at the New York Public Library discovered a small gray file box filled with questions posed to the venerable institution's librarians between 1940 and 1980. A new book, Peculiar Questions and Practical Answers: A Little Book of Whimsy and Wisdom from the Files of The New York Public Library collects these questions alongside answers provided by NYPL librarians."

A few of us in CAHSLA remember the file box kept by reference librarian Ruth Epstein at UC Medical Center Library. Ruth was a "librarian's librarian." Those of us in hospital libraries knew that we could contact her when we had exhausted all hope of answering a reference question.

Below are just 10 questions plucked from the book. To read the answers, consult the
article 10 Strange Questions People Asked NYPL Librarians Before Google.
  1. Is it possible to keep an octopus in a private home? (1944)
  2. What is the significance of the hip movement in the Hawaiian dance? (1944)
  3. What time does a bluebird sing? (1944)
  4. How much did Napoleon's brain weigh? (1945)
  5. Can mice throw up? (1949)
  6. What kind of apple did Eve eat? (1956)
  7. What is the life cycle of an eyebrow hair? (1948)
  8. What did women use for shopping bags before paper bags came into use? (N.D.)
  9. What is the nutritional value of human flesh? (1958)
  10. Who was the real Dracula? (1972)
  11. Why do 18th-century English paintings have so many squirrels in them, and how did they tame them so that they wouldn't bite the painter? (1976)

Final Thought

"Opinion is really the lowest form of human knowledge. It requires no accountability, no understanding. The highest form of knowledge is empathy, for it requires us to suspend our egos and live in another's world. It requires profound purpose larger than the self kind of understanding." ~ Bill Bullard

5/13/2021

May 2021, No.153



Between the weather and the pandemic, we sure had a long winter in the Cincinnati area. While Spring has arrived and covid-19 vaccines are available for some ages, many in our community, and millions around the world, are actively suffering physically and mentally from this disease. Many are feeling emotional pain, anger, stress, and loneliness because of losing loved ones, caregiving, treating covid-19 patients, adapting to new work environments, virtual learning, and the loss of familiar routines and faces to name a few.

So, let’s talk about it; after all, May is Mental Health Awareness Month. How do you take care of yourself? We know a healthy diet and regular exercise are important, but we also might need professional help for mental health issues that arise. We seek treatments for physical diseases; mental health diseases should be no different. In this issue, you will find information and resources about mental health. I have also included some silly memes to hopefully make
you smile and laugh. Please take care of yourselves!


Jennifer Pettigrew, President


Meeting Report – February 25, 2021

Time: 5:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.

Attending: Pettigrew, Jennifer; Koshoffer, Amy; Kean, Emily; McCormick, Lisa; Hill, Barbarie; Herrlein, Starbuck, Edith; Alex; Temple, Alex [guest]; Bartels, Jacqueline [guest].

CAHSLA held a virtual meeting via WebEx hosted by Amy Koshoffer. President Jennifer Pettigrew welcomed everyone to the meeting and invited attendees to do an introduction

Attendees described how they are functioning in their organization during the ongoing pandemic Some CAHSLA members are still working virtually (Kean, Starbuck, and Koshoffer at UC for example) while others are doing onsite work (Pettigrew at TCH; Herrlein at Lloyd by appointment).

Amy introduced the idea of a virtual journal club. She will conduct an online survey to gauge interest. As chair of the program committee, Amy is in discussion with June Taylor-Slaughter, supervisor and manager of student workers at UC, to do a presentation to CAHSLA on microaggression in the library. It may be possible to co-host this presentation with SLA. More details will follow.

Thanks to Cara Yurkowski (formerly TCH) who created a “Jeopardy” game with a library/information/literary theme. Amy acted as the emcee. It was a challenging, lively, and highly competitive game. The winner of this round was Lisa McCormick (formerly TJH).

The meeting concluded at approximately 6:30 p.m.

Respectfully submitted, Lisa McCormick, Secretary

Meeting Report – April 13, 2021

Time: 5:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Attending: Pettigrew, Jennifer; Koshoffer, Amy; Kean, Emily; McCormick, Lisa; Bryant, Kathleen [guest]; Taylor-Slaughter, June [presenter].

CASHLA held a virtual education meeting via WebEx hosted by Amy Koshoffer. We welcomed a Northern Kentucky University library student guest to the meeting, Kathleen Bryant.

Amy introduced the speaker, June Taylor-Slaughter, Public Service Manager and Student Supervisor, UC Geology-Mathematics-Physics Library, for a presentation and discussion of Microaggressions in Libraries. June, a 25+ years UC staff, was awarded the university’s 2021 Marian Spencer Equity Ambassador Award for staff. By way of background, June explained that the onboarding course was a product of the COVID-19 pause in onsite work which gave her the extended time period to develop a formalized training course in diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) for UC Libraries student workers.

Student workers are at the front-line of customer interactions, and, because of the diverse community of library users they encounter, often as the first face representing UC, June wanted to develop a training course to promote the people skills necessary for a diverse customer population. An eight module, online DEI training course that incorporates video and participant interaction, to educates the user on microaggression is the outcome of June’s COVID-19 project. (Microaggression is a term used for brief and commonplace daily verbal, behavioral or environmental indignities, whether intentional or unintentional, that communicates hostile, derogatory, or negative attitudes toward stigmatized or culturally marginalized groups. Wikipedia)

Two resources highlighted in the course are by Dr. Derald Wing Sue: Microaggressions: More than just race; and Micrograggression in everyday life: race, gender, and sexual orientation [2010 Hoboken, NJ; Wiley Publications].

Those in attendance had the opportunity to chat and offer feedback to Ms. Taylor-Slaughter at the conclusion of her presentation.

Following the educational presentation, Jennifer led a brief informal meeting. The idea of an in-person end-of-the-year picnic was briefly discussed. Amy offered to do some investigating on possibilities. Kathleen Bryant, library student guest, had the opportunity to seek in-put on identifying the availability of library internships during the pandemic.

The meeting concluded at approximately 6:30 p.m.

Respectfully submitted, Lisa McCormick, Secretary


Program Committee Report

On April 13th, June Taylor-Slaughter gave a presentation on Microaggressions to a small but interested group of attendees (#6). Ms. Taylor is the public service manager and student supervisor for UC Libraries Geology Math and Physics Library. Her entertaining presentation and discussion highlighted what is a microagression, the different types and how we might check ourselves to prevent the harm they cause. A similar version of this presentation is used to train student library workers.

Next up is our annual picnic. Planning is still under way.

Respectfully submitted, Amy Koshoffer, Program Committee Chair

2021-05-12 CAHSLA Treasurer Report

CHECKING BALANCE

as of 12/18/2020:

$1,997.51

CHECKING DEPOSITS

Membership Dues (2)

$50.86

CHECKING DEPOSIT TOTALS

 

$50.86

CHECKING WITHDRAWALS

Meeting Honorarium

$34.94

CHECKING WITHDRAWAL TOTALS

 

$34.94

CHECKING BALANCE

as of 05/12/2021:

$2,013.43

CASH BALANCE

as of 12/18/2020:

$20.00

CASH DEPOSITS

 

$0.00

CASH WITHDRAWALS

 

$0.00

CASH BALANCE

as of 05/12/2021:

$20.00

TOTAL ASSETS

as of 05/12/2021:

$2,033.43

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


MEMBERS

9 Regular (Paid)

0 Student (Paid)
11 Life Members

20 TOTAL
Respectfully submitted by Emily Kean, Treasurer


Cara Yurkowski, Electronic Resources Librarian at The Christ Hospital Network’s The James N. Gamble Library and CAHSLA Treasurer (2018-2020) Program Committee Co-Chair (2018-2019), is now editing and proofreading fulltime. We are very grateful to Cara for her contributions to CAHSLA and will miss her.. We wish her much success in her business.

Lisa McCormick (formerly TJH) is published in the Spring 2021 OHSLA Voice. The article, Annual CAHSLA Book Drive Perseveres Through Pandemic, describes CAHSLA’s very successful collaboration with Melanie Moore’s Cincy Book Bus to continue the annual holiday book drive in 2020 which benefitted Lighthouse Youth Services.

Regina Hartman is sad to report that Shawntel Ensminger (Archive Intern at The Christ Hospital) passed away on April 8 after a long battle with cancer. Although she was battling another recurrence, Shawntel’s death was unexpected, as she had been working 2 days before. Here is a link to a memorial tribute on her blog: (S)intelligent (sintelligently.blogspot.com


2020's Most Challenged Books Addressed Racism and the LGBTQ Community
The American Library Association (ALA) conducts an annual survey among librarians to identify those books that were challenged for inclusion in public, school, or university libraries. The 2020 survey found “For the first time in the survey's history, six of the 10 most-challenged books — out of 273 books that were targeted in libraries, schools and universities — touched on issues of race, and the complaints ranged from "divisive language" to "anti-police views” according to a report on the WLWT website. By contrast, in 2019, the top 10 most challenged books dealt with LBGTQ themes.


“Rapping Librarian” Abruptly Resigns from Smith College Library
Admittedly, the title of the article and where it is published, Rolling Stone, is the reason for including this news tidbit. How a Rapping Librarian Became a Right-Wing Anti-Cancel Culture Hero chronicles the alleged ongoing challenges by former Smith College librarian Jodi Shaw, to College’s programs on racial justice and diverse hiring practices as creating for her, a white woman, a “racially hostile environment.” The last straw for Shaw at the women's liberal arts college in Pine Grove, Massachusetts, according to the article, was being reprimanded for rapping at a library orientation.

Coping with Pandemic Stress
The most recent article by Scientific American contributing editor, Melinda Wenner Moyer, Coping with Pandemic Stress [Scientific American. Mar2021, Vol. 324 Issue 3, p46-51] addresses the unprecedented rise in depression and anxiety brought on by the pandemic and offers some scientific backed approaches to coping. She cites several studies, those that have been published and those pending publication, that are tracking the mental toll that the pandemic has taken. Some scientists have found 25-30% increases in depression and anxiety in those surveyed about the mental health impact of the pandemic.

One of Wenner Moyer’s main points in the article is that people can develop resiliency – and it is resiliency that will get us through the social and psychological upheaval of the pandemic. She taps into the knowledge of mental health practitioners in the fields of trauma, disaster, and rehabilitation psychology to reveal the foundation for resiliency: "When people in devastating situations can spot warning signs of mental trouble, acknowledge and express their distress, focus on the present moment and the small things they can control, and find ways to connect with others, they can get through the darkest of moments and show resilience."

According to the article: (1) Look for warning signs such as changes in appetite and/or sleep patterns, irritability, and physical symptoms such as pain or gastrointestinal distress; (2) Acknowledge your fear. "You can feel scared and fearful and angry and resentful and simultaneously be a victor and be resilient. Reminding people that they are both, versus either/or, is extremely important."

To cope, Wenner Moyer advises: (1) Find new ways to connect with people or a therapist– virtually, by email or snail mail; (2) Find ways to help others -volunteer. Volunteering/being of service helps one to feel more useful, connected, and hopeful about the future. The act of volunteering can lessen one's feelings of distress; (3) Pay attention to yourself through mindfulness practices. Practicing mindfulness helps to lessen distress and experience calmness by focusing on the present moment. Mindfulness practices include meditation (there's an app for that: Breathe 2 Relax and Mindfulness Coach), focused breathing, or pulling out your colored pencils and a coloring book.


Libraries as Mental Health Hubs
The provision of library and information services can be impacted by the emotional and mental health state of the patron – or the librarian. Talk to any librarian about disruptive patrons, and you may get an outpouring of stories of the stressful or sometimes harrowing encounters they have experienced. Heather Stringer has written an article, Libraries as Mental Health Hubs, describing how some libraries are employing social workers or librarians specially trained in “mental health first aid” to connect patrons with mental health services or to de-escalate angry or upset patrons.

Stringer also describes a National Network of Libraries of Medicine funded project at the Avon Free Public Library in Avon, Connecticut, “where 40% of the city’s population is age 50 or older, librarian Tina Panik decided to partner with the senior center to offer more education about mental health. Through funding from the NNLM, the library offered a series of 16 programs on such topics as memory loss, depression and grief.” Stringer describes several public library programs for mental health of their communities that have been operational for many years, like the San Francisco Public Library System that first employed a social worker in 2009.

If you are interested in a mental health first aid course, consult https://www.mentalhealthfirstaid.org/take-a-course/find-a-course/,


Professor Advocates for Mental Health Support for Librarians
Abigail Phillips, assistant professor in the School of Information Studies at the University of Milwaukee-Wisconsin is an advocate for supporting the mental health needs of library workers. Amanda Niebauer writes in the UMW Report about the work of Phillips along with other professors of library and information studies across the country to provide support to those library workers with poor mental health. As Phillips says, there is “emotional labor” involved with delivering information and library services to distressed communities and individuals, and library workers do not always have the support to handle the burden this work entails. The article cites one study among academic librarians that reported more than half of the survey participants had a diagnosed mental health condition.

Read the full article by Niebauer for Phillips approach to supporting the library community with the creation of annual zine titled “Reserve and Renew: the LIS Mental Health Zine,” The zine “is filled with submissions from librarians, library volunteers, professors and students from all over the U.S.” with poetry, artwork, comics, and personal stories as a way for library workers to find a supportive community.


Top Mental Health Apps 2021
Psych Central has highlighted their top mental health apps to improve mental well-being. Listed below are the apps the website is highlighting. Some of the apps are free and others incur a fee; read the fine print before downloading.
· Best for anxiety: MindShift
· Best for PTSD: PTSD Coach
· Best for deep breathing: BellyBio
· Best for quitting unwanted habits: Quit That!
· Best for stress relief: Take a Break!
· Best for CBT and ACT: What’s Up?
· Best for people of color: Shine
· Best for better sleep: Relax with Andrew Johnson Lite
· Best overall symptom tracker: Bearable
· Best for bipolar disorder: eMoods



Need Help?
If you suspect that you or a loved one is suffering from a mental health disorder, please seek help. One of the resources below may be able to assist. For medical emergencies, dial 911 immediately.
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline – Call 800-273-TALK (8255). If you or someone you know is in crisis—whether they are considering suicide or not—please call the toll-free Lifeline at 800-273-TALK (8255) to speak with a trained crisis counselor 24/7. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline connects you with a crisis center in the Lifeline network closest to your location. Your call will be answered by a trained crisis worker who will listen empathetically and without judgment. The crisis worker will work to ensure that you feel safe and help identify options and information about mental health services in your area. Your call is confidential and free.
  • Crisis Text Line – Text NAMI to 741-741 Connect with a trained crisis counselor to receive free, 24/7 crisis support via text message.
  • National Domestic Violence Hotline – Call 800-799-SAFE (7233) Trained expert advocates are available 24/7 to provide confidential support to anyone experiencing domestic violence or seeking resources and information. Help is available in Spanish and other languages.
  • National Sexual Assault Hotline – Call 800-656-HOPE (4673) Connect with a trained staff member from a sexual assault service provider in your area that offers access to a range of free services. Crisis chat support is available at Online Hotline. Free help, 24/7.
  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) - Call 1-800-662-HELP (4357) . Also known as, the Treatment Referral Routing Service, this Helpline provides 24-hour free and confidential treatment referral and information about mental and/or substance use disorders, prevention, and recovery in English and Spanish.
  • Veterans Crisis Line Call 1-800-273-8255 and Press 1, Chat, or Text 838255 .Connect with the Veterans Crisis Line to reach caring, qualified responders with the Department of Veterans Affairs. Many of them are Veterans themselves.